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Displaying items by tag: Management

Thursday, 05 October 2017 08:00

Why this last quarter will set you up for 2018

The last quarter in Australia is always a tricky one. With public holidays, grand finals, racing carnivals, school holidays and the festive season parties, many sales and marketing professionals put their foot off the accelerator.
Published in Marketing
Monday, 24 April 2017 08:07

Your marketing won't change overnight

One of the biggest misconceptions that business owners have it is that if they have a marketing strategy developed, all of a sudden, overnight, an influx of leads will come through the door.

It's hard running a business, and even harder to manage the fact that many entrepreneurs and CEO's want everything 'yesterday' and are impatient by nature. That same impatience often makes them very success, as does their attention to detail, but when it comes marketing, unless you have an unlimited budget, it is impossible to be an overnight success.

As an owner of an agency, I know this thought process too well.

It takes a good 20 to 40 hours minimum to write a marketing strategy, and that is after research and a 4-hour workshop. To expect that to be finished overnight in itself is impossible and would be only at the determent of the client. No-one is that good, that innovative and creative to put their knowledge into a strategy that is campaign driven to drive leads. No-one. We could put 20 people on the one strategy and it still would not be right after a week - and that is fact.

I come up with my best ideas away from the office. Not sitting at my desk under pressure.
Published in Marketing
Never stretch yourself so far that when the rope can't take it any more, it springs back so far that there is far too many creases to fix. The business person who has the most ideas, doesn't always win, unless of course, they have a team of people who have learned that while they may have great ideas, they are terrible at execution.
I'm the person who is always at the office at 7am. 

My office in Sydney is all the more special at that time of day as I look at the harbour, soak in the constant flow of trains going through and watch the cars flow to a point where they stop, as traffic becomes jammed as everyone rushes to work at the same time.
Published in Marketing
When you have travelled the world as much as me, there is one thing that you know is always going to be a given – that hotels are a must.

Now, if you must stay in a hotel, then you usually either want your normal comforts or you look for something different to what you already have at home. Something better, sometimes something just different.

Published in Culture
Tuesday, 25 August 2015 14:46

Please, keep your pants on

Never give away everything, it's as simple as that.

Too many entrepreneurs get so desperate that they give away the kitchen sink when in fact all their prospect wanted to know was that they could do a good job.

As an entrepreneur, it's hard to start a business and to keep it going year-after-year profitability creating value and jobs. But many do so very successful, and yet those who fail seem to do so falling often on their own sword.
Published in Management
They're young having the time of their lives while studying their arses off, and as part of their University Degree or off their own bat, they have decided to do an internship. Luckily for me, it's at Marketing Eye.

First of all, they send off their resumes to hundreds of different companies requesting an internship. In Australia, they are largely not paid, so interns are volunteering their own time in reward for hands on experience.

I once said to an intern that when they finished their University Degree that they would be more employable due to their internship and ability to attract 50,000 to a blog, than those of who may have received a better score. Experience particularly in marketing counts for something.

So, I asked some of our interns, what an internship is really like. Here's what they had to say:
Published in Culture
When I was a child, my father left for work at 5.30am and didn't return until the early evening. He was a builder and, for that profession, long hours were quite normal.

When he arrived home, my father completed his chores. He took out the rubbish, mowed the lawn and fixed anything that needed to be fixed. He then sat down to dinner, where each of us Smith children told him our daily, animated stories followed by an update about what we did at school.

We then watched an hour of television as a family and it was off to bed.

When my father talked about his work, which was physical as much as mental, his only complaint was that an employee turned up five minutes late – it was never that they didn't work hard enough.
Published in Management
Monday, 01 September 2014 00:00

Why you have to stop looking for perfection

'Nothing would be done at all if a man waited until he could do it so well that noone could find a fault with it.' Cardinal Newman

The pursuit of perfection has been a struggle for me personally my entire life. What started out as a 'Virgo' trait, has led to a constant battle with striving for flawlessness and setting excessively high performance expectations of both myself and others. Going deeper then just a focus on personal life, my business has constantly been hindered by my inherent need for perfection, and I am not alone. There are many others out there that are exactly the same.

Entrepreneurs are renowned for certain types of behaviours including obsessive compulsive disorders, perfectionism, neuroticism - all often being the key reasons why things somethings don't go in the direction that they would have hoped. I call it self-sabotage, because noone is perfect and 80 percent is ok - yet trying telling that to my brain when it is on overload.

I learned earlier on in my business career that 80 percent had to do and by micro managing, nothing would ever get done, nor would the business grow. If only I could do everything myself, there would simply be no need for employees. Letting go and learning to adapt differently was singularly the best thing I could ever have done, and the only reason I have been able to grow an international business.

But from time to time, I fall prey to seeing things that are not done quite right, and having my little 'freak out' moment. 

When it comes to business, I desire the perfect marketing campaign, the perfect employee, and the perfect business - yet, that is impossible to achieve and you cannot place that kind of pressure and expectation on those around you - or you are bound to fail.
Published in Management
The next 12-months is going to be incredibly different for people who work at Marketing Eye. After years of working hard at establishing a product and service that is unsurpassed by industry standards, driven by technology, systems and processes, we are now working tirelessly on how to build the right culture going forward.

There have been many hit and misses and lots of unnecessary frustration, but finally I think as a team we have hit the nail on the head and I am about to test it to the nth degree.

Flat Organisational Structure

Weaning employees off hierarchy-driven decision making has been a test of both patience and perseverance. Gen-Y's have been told that they need leadership in order to be successful, yet some of the most successful companies in the world, like Google, are saying quite the opposite. Their investment in a flat organisational structure has not only shown dividends on the balance sheet, but it has created a workplace and culture that the world-over admires and respects.

For smaller companies that have an established organisational structure, driven largely by an entrepreneur, it is more difficult to adapt to a flat organisational structure with the primary reason being that both parties; the entrepreneur and the employees, find it difficult to let go.

I have been travelling the world growing "my small business" and have found that it is almost impossible to be the leader I would have hoped to be, living the life I do. I certainly am no role model in this department, nor do I follow the many books I have bought over time on "how to be a good leader" no matter how much I try but ultimately fail in my pursuit.

Published in Marketing
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