Marketing Blog

Marketing Blog

We have four (4) gun marketing interns in our Sydney office, and given that they seemed to love chatting to each other and working together, we gave them a task to write a blog. We didn't expect quite this though...

Our expectations as marketing interns

Published in Marketing
Today I met with a remarkable, young woman who has the world at her feet. She is intelligent, well-spoken and might I add, well-presented... not that that means too much, but what I am alluding to is that she has the full package.
Published in Marketing
I'm often asked what my management style is and it's a very hard question to answer. I am almost never "there" and we have had in place until two years ago a CEO, so there was never a reason for me to be actively involved in day-to-day management or leadership. In the past two years, we have focused on a flat management style where no-one really has a boss but they have a "coach" or person to go to with a title of State Manager whenever they feel the need to for normal administrative purposes or if they feel they are looking for leadership.
Published in Management
The journey that Marketing Eye has taken over the past few years has hit a major milestone and the business is now heading into a future rich with possibility.

This is despite our expansion into the US, which was undertaken with a half-arsed approach; we set up ‘part-time’ and employed a few people who were left to their own devices. After initial training, of course.
Published in Marketing
Of the Oscar nominated films I have watched so far – and I have watched a few – Whiplash has been my favourite. Putting aside the amazing performance by JK Simmons and the incredible score, it got me thinking about how far people are willing to go to get the best out of themselves and others. 

How far do you push? Is your best good enough or do you strive for better, for more or even to be the best? 
Published in Management
The next 12-months is going to be incredibly different for people who work at Marketing Eye. After years of working hard at establishing a product and service that is unsurpassed by industry standards, driven by technology, systems and processes, we are now working tirelessly on how to build the right culture going forward.

There have been many hit and misses and lots of unnecessary frustration, but finally I think as a team we have hit the nail on the head and I am about to test it to the nth degree.

Flat Organisational Structure

Weaning employees off hierarchy-driven decision making has been a test of both patience and perseverance. Gen-Y's have been told that they need leadership in order to be successful, yet some of the most successful companies in the world, like Google, are saying quite the opposite. Their investment in a flat organisational structure has not only shown dividends on the balance sheet, but it has created a workplace and culture that the world-over admires and respects.

For smaller companies that have an established organisational structure, driven largely by an entrepreneur, it is more difficult to adapt to a flat organisational structure with the primary reason being that both parties; the entrepreneur and the employees, find it difficult to let go.

I have been travelling the world growing "my small business" and have found that it is almost impossible to be the leader I would have hoped to be, living the life I do. I certainly am no role model in this department, nor do I follow the many books I have bought over time on "how to be a good leader" no matter how much I try but ultimately fail in my pursuit.

Published in Marketing
Tuesday, 08 April 2014 00:00

Leadership and the role marketing plays

"Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations." —Peter Drucker

If you look at Steve Jobs and his role as a leader and marketer at Apple Inc., it's easy to see how the two roles work closely together. Without marketing, no-one would be any the wiser about Steve Jobs role at Apple Inc nor would we have had the opportunity to be captivated by his performances each time he launched a new product. Instead, we would simply wait for a product to be on the shelves and without all the "sizzle" we probably would never have been as enticed to stand in line and buy each product the minute it was launched.

Some leaders fail to see the value in marketing, and although they may have a role in the organisation that is responsible for certain outcomes, they may see it more as a sales related function which is why it often falls under this umbrella.

Smart, insightful, charismatic, thought leaders understand the value of marketing. They use it and often abuse it to become leaders that everyone follows. Rather than focus solely on a product or service marketing campaign, they use it to elevate their position in the market with a double edge sword, by at the same time ensuring that the company brand and positioning benefits from association.

3 Ways Leaders Use Marketing 

Don't be fooled to think that in 2013 you have time to waste. Everyone is now faster, smarter, better - all with extraordinary tools at their disposal.

Embarking on global expansion has been the most fascinating experience and in particular, working in what is one of America's most untapped entrepreneurial hubs of Atlanta has not only been rewarding, but also very invigorating.

Atlanta isn't the sleepy town that some of the cities counterparts seem to think it is. In fact, it is quite the opposite. The city is full of promise, spirit and an attitude that is less ruthless than say New York, Chicago, San Francisco or Los Angeles. Behind the politeness and accomodating attitudes of Atlanta's business folk are smart, determined, ambitious and thoroughly capable people who drive small businesses in an endeavour to become big businesses.

Capitalising on an ability to cap salaries and deliver products and services to a national and international audience with America's most proficient transport hub at its disposal, Atlanta entrepeneurs are dreaming big. You heard it right - they are dreaming big. Not too dissimilar to their New York small business friends who have inspired a national through a carefully executed tabloid and magazine advertising campaign that let's the world know that in New York "This is no place to dream small."

What strikes me about the people of Atlanta is their attitude to helping others and in turn, helping themselves. It seems that those who don't come from here, tend to be the one's to watch, whereas if you do business with a true Atlanta local, you are guaranteed that the good old fashion handshake on a deal is exactly that. 

Today I had lunch with two talented mergers and acquisition partners at Deloitte. They both are very busy people but were kind enough to take time out of their day to have a chat about business, tax and the run of the land in setting up in Atlanta, buying a home and a motor vehicle.
When you are a small business, it is hard to find money just to pay the bills most of the time, let alone invest in team bonding or outsourced employee development.

I know that in the first couple of years of business, other than some hands on training from moi, my team received little if any outside training to develop their skills and capabilities as marketing consultants.

They were expected (sadly, this was the case) to research and find their own path to developing their careers as marketing consultants and were expected to use market research and the Internet as resources to learn about small businesses and the challenges they go through on a day to day basis.
Monday, 26 September 2011 08:08

Anyone can learn how to be a great leader

When you start a small business, it's hard to think about what leadership style you would like to incorporate in your company. Typically, your thoughts are on what product or service you would like to take to market; your business plan; how you are going to get sales; and how you will attract the right people to work for you.

Leadership styles is often thought to be a medium or larger business thought-process.
Published in Management
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