Marketing Blog tag: 'magazine' - Marketing Eye

Displaying items by tag: magazine

Thursday, 07 February 2019 09:22

How office design affects your performance

It's an incredible privilege to be in the position to buy an office building to take our company to the next level. We have rented space for 20-years and that has been a waste of money, because we could have been putting that money into our own office environment.
Published in Culture
Monday, 25 January 2016 08:59

Some people never learn the lesson

We've all been employees at some time in our life and many of us, no matter how good we think we are as people, have made a mistake or two in the roles we have been employed in. It's human, and expected. 

What is interesting though, is that some people never learn the lesson. As employers we all hope that they do it all when they are young, and then move on to taking a more mature approach to things, especially if they want to get ahead in their careers.

The challenges of being an employee are many, but mostly, it's about life in general. People spend so much time at work, they have to love it, and get the most out of the situation. It has to be part of a greater plan.

My first employer was a perfectionist

When I was younger, I remember one of my first employers was a perfectionist, and it was hard to always be 'perfect' at everything I did. But I learned not to make the same mistake twice and always listen, take notes and check my work before handing it in. At the time, I was terrified of him, but respected him because of his talent and the fact that he did some really smart things and ran a business with no University Degree, or backing. Just an inate business capability, creativity and a desire to do everything 'perfectly'. He also had a philosophy that everyone must stop for morning tea and afternoon tea regardless and sit together and chat about anything other than work.

I was paid $12,000 per year

It challenges you as an employee to live up to these expectations, but it has set me up for life and for that I am grateful. I also hold this employer in the highest regard. I was paid $12,000 per year, and after a few months, he put it up to $14,000 per year. I wanted to come to work earlier, and work later, but my immediate supervisor was against this, and it's funny, as I am that same person today with my staff. I don't want for them to work long hours. I want for them to live life.

You could sleep your way to the top

Other employers taught me different things; working in big corporations particularly in the media I learned that politics is everything, and back then, you possibly could sleep your way to the top (sad but true). I never did and never have, but it was possible back then - less so now. Another employer taught me the importance of good family values and treating everyone like they are a member of your family. Being there when things are tough, and allowing stars to shine. They also taught me that there are some people that you should just let go - and see what they come up with. They did that to me, and it's amazing what I achieved and how proud of that work I am today. I am still in contact with them and still part of the family. Something I cherish.

Then there was the opportunist employer, who at the time I was grateful for giving me an opportunity, but found that values are more important. I left only because I needed to stay on the career path of marketing and the role was too PR related. He saw an opportunity in the not-for-profit space and took it.

I didn't quite respect him

The last one that really touched me and helped shape me was someone I didn't quite respect, but learned that you should take risks and networking is everything. What I loved about that job was the fact that I was able to meet some of the most powerful and influential people in the world, and travel with them promoting an industry. The lack of respect only comes from my own moral compass, but I do believe that it is important to appreciate what these people give us in knowledge and insight. He taught me that age doesn't matter when it comes to jobs. He had a 21 year old run a magazine straight from University. He also taught me that some people just have ability to hire the right people, and he certainly did that. Everyone who worked there was ambitious and went on to become serious players in their careers.

Standout employees make others sometimes feel insecure

My very last big role before starting my own business taught me what it is like to work in an environment where you stand out, but that makes other's feel insecure. How to manage that, I did not know at the time, but I watch for that in my team now and make sure that they navigate that path in a way that brings out the best in everyone.

Working for someone is a privilege, and even though I am saying that as an employer, I think many young people forget that. Owners of small businesses in particular have a lot of stress and have to think about things you would never have considered. Paying payroll and ensuring that there are enough clients to sustain a business is just part of it. But it's also HR, accounting, marketing, legal and leadership. There is so much to think of. Why I say that it is a privilege is because whether you like it or not, they make sure that every week you get your salary, your super is paid and you get 4 weeks annual leave, 10 days minimum sick leave, and 10 days or so that are public holidays. That's a lot for FREE, and I know employees don't see it that way, but at the end of the day, this takes a huge chunk out of the year and productivity.

I am grateful

As an employer, I am grateful. I have given myself the opportunity to have the dream job, but with everything that is good, there is always challenges that bring you back to reality. 

Today's team of people that work at Marketing Eye are amazing. I am lucky. Anyone who has ever left, meant to leave. We only live once and as long as we do so with integrity and compassion, it's a life worth living.
Published in Management
I have been putting magazines together since the Czech Republic applied for membership to the EU. That was 1996 and back then Tupac was still alive, Trainspotting was released into cinemas and the French halted nuclear testing in the Pacific.

Magazine production has been my passion for almost 20 years, and whilst I am making myself feel old writing this blog, there has remained a sense of achievement with each and every issue of the thousands I have helped produce, including the latest issue of Marketing Eye.
Published in Marketing
Wednesday, 01 April 2015 08:51

How to succeed in magazine publishing

The long road to establishing a commercial version of Marketing Eye magazine is now complete. It took almost six months to get it publishing ready, but after losing a bit more hair and seeing the ones that I have left go grey (almost), it was well worth the effort.

By putting this magazine together, I have learnt a great deal about marketing, about the client services sector and about staying the course, even when the Tough Mudder founders seem to have come along and put insurmountable obstacles in my path.*
Published in Marketing
Tuesday, 24 June 2014 00:00

The reality of where we are at right now

My heart is beating fast and I begin to feel agitated. Something tells me that it's not going to go away, but an experienced perspective tells me that it will.

It's tough enough running a business, without having to deal with the things in life that make you question your own decision making process and to a degree, the path that you are going on.

I have wasted the last few years in no-man's land, pushing through on the business front and having great success that has made me proud of the people involved who have made it happen, but for me personally, I am not quite there.
Published in Mellissah Smith
Nadia Kerr’s personalised gifts business, DigiGifts, explains what marketing avenues worked and what did not in her road to success. Log onto www.DigiGifts.com.au and find out about what it takes to be a leader in the personal gifts industry.