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Sydney Morning Herald

The cherry growing market is buoyant, and many fruit growing businesses are seeking opportunities and building partnerships with overseas buyers. But breaking into global markets takes time and effort, as we have learned.

When we first considered exporting manufacturing equipment as a business strategy we already had some demand for our cherry grading equipment. Early on, one Italian customer purchased three of our machines to sort and grade cherries. It was from this one customer – who happened to have a very high profile in the industry – that we were then able to build relationships with European and Turkish customers. This taught us that it is vital when considering export markets to gain key contacts that will help push your brand and product.

After our initial market entry, we began receiving more interest from Italy and around the same time were approached by an Italian agent to represent us. This allowed us to develop a more concerted push into other export markets.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 11, 2015

Dallas, TX –  International marketing consultancy firm, Marketing Eye, has launched in the Dallas, Texas area with Tracy Moore heading its operations.

Marketing Eye focuses heavily on technology, manufacturing, professional services and health sectors, and works with more than 100 companies, leveraging proprietary and select software to power marketing department efficiencies. It is also known for using a disruptive approach to outsourced marketing.

Their model is simple – your company gets an outsourced marketing department for a fixed annual fee. Marketing Eye’s marketing department solution includes all graphic design, web, search engine optimization, application of marketing automation, public relations, lead generation and social media.

“Marketing Eye’s model is customized and structured -- providing companies with an outsourced marketing model, aimed at catapulting your company’s growth through effective marketing solutions,” said Tracy Moore, Regional Manager, Marketing Eye.  “Our aim is to take companies that are ready to take the leap from being a small business to a medium sized one, and develop an effective and translatable marketing strategy aligned with business goals.”

Published on The Age on November 5, 2014 and written by Sylvia Pennington.

It's one of the most critical - and sometimes ephemeral - aspects of business. So how do you get it?

Money may make the business world go round – but hot on its heels comes trust; the belief that the person we're dealing with is honest and will act in good faith. Most of us like to think of ourselves as "trustworthy" – but what does it actually mean and how do we go about convincing others that we merit the description?

Published by Dave Kerpen on LikeableLocal

Happy 2015! Here's to a making it the most #likeable year yet. Want to know what I love most about Twitter? The people. Reading tweets from my favorite thought leaders gives me such inspiration. That's why I'm thrilled to announce the top 150 thought leaders to follow on Twitter in 2015. Your Twitter newsfeed just got a whole lot more interesting.

Follow this list to keep up with all 150 thought-leading marketers in one place.

Mark Pope, Business First

A lack of engagement, immediate or otherwise, often results in employee disengagement and this can have dire consequences for the business and staff member. When an employee enters a workplace for the first time, he or she is full of initiative, ideas and strategies that could very well improve down the line efficiencies.

There are risks inherent in any business. Most company leaders look only to financial burden, cost imperatives and bottom line policy. They expect employees to come in and perform a set task. That is fine if that is all they want for their business, but good leaders will encourage their staff to undertake those tasks and improve on their efficiencies.

RMIT STUDENTS HONE TECHNICAL SKILLS WITH ALFEX CNC MACHINES

Manufacturing is critical to the health of Australia’s economy. That’s why it’s important for tertiary institutions to take a forward-thinking approach to partnering with manufacturers and suppliers who are ready to support our future workforce. Jonathan Jackson reports ...

Much has been made of government’s lack of support for the manufacturing industry. It has far reaching effects on the economy, innovation and not least the lives of those who lose their means.

Are you a Jaxon, a Rylee, a Danyle or a Jorja? Or, as a parent, have you christened a Klowee, Zaq, Jesyka, Kayleb,  or even an Epponnee-Rae, in tribute to the double-barrelled bub of Kath and Kim fame?

'Creatively' spelt names have become all the rage in recent decades. Parents in favour see them as a celebration of uniqueness that will enable their children to stand out from the crowd.

But what's the story when the schoolroom is swapped for the workplace? Is an unconventionally-spelt moniker a help or a hindrance when climbing the corporate ladder? The former, says Mellissah Smith, the founder of Sydney and Atlanta-based consultancy Marketing Eye, who scored her name by accident, courtesy of her immigrant father. "Mum and dad couldn't spell," Smith says. "My father hardly spoke English – he's Croatian – and he filled in the birth certificate."